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June 2022 - WhatsApp Impersonating Family or Children Scam

A scam trend has emerged where you may be contacted via Whatsapp, SMS or other Social Media from individuals claiming to be family or children who are in urgent need of money (Ref: 2022, June 01. Yahoo!News).

Victims have reported receiving messages stating, ‘Hi Mum’ or ‘Hi Dad’, the scammer then claims that their phone has been lost, stolen or damaged and the number they are contacting them on is their new contact number, and request their victim to save the new number.

The scammer, purporting to be a family member, may claim that they are in trouble with an authoritative figure such as the police, or that they have urgent payments or bills which they are unable to pay due to their phone being lost or broken. The scammer urgently requests the victim to make the payment on their behalf as soon as possible and that they will return the money promptly.

What to look out for and how to protect yourself:

  • Be cautious of all approaches you did not initiate, especially if you are asked to send money online.
  • Messages requesting money may become more desperate, persistent, or direct. If you do send money, they continue to ask you to send more.
  • Do not respond to the contact unless you are 100% sure if they are genuine.
  • Confirm the identity of the contact by calling the supposed family member directly via a reliable or previously known contact number.
  • Do not conduct any payments or transfers instructed by the third party until you have verbal confirmation over the phone from the intended recipient/family member.
  • Do not provide your banking details, Visa debit Card details or your personal information to anyone over messages, especially on a message that you did not initiate.

If you have any concerns about the legitimacy of correspondence, contact us directly (either via financialcrimes@boq.com.au or using the details on our Contact Us page).

If you think you have paid money to a scammer, contact your bank immediately.

Helpful Links and resources:

https://www.scamwatch.gov.au/

https://au.news.yahoo.com/whatsapp-mum-and-dad-scam-explained-police-issue-warning-140347728.html

As of recent, there is a new scamA scam trend has emerged circulating where our customers have beenyou may be contacted via Whatsapp, text message or Facebook MessengerSMS or other Social Media from individuals claiming to be family or children who are in urgent need of money (Ref: 2022, June 01. Yahoo!News).

Our customers have reported toVictims have reported receiving messages from scammers stating, ‘Hi Mmum’ or ‘Hi Ddad’, the scammer thenwho c claims that their phone has been lost, stolen or damaged and the number they are contacting them on is their new contact number, and request their victim to save the new number.

The scammer, purporting to be a family member,s may claim that they are in trouble with an authoritative figure such as the police, or that they have bills overdueurgent payments or bills which they are unable to pay due to their phone being lost or broken. The scammer urgently requests to receive money to pay off their debtthe victim to make the payment on their behalf as soon as possible and claims that they will pay our customersreturn the money promptly back..

These types of scams escalate to a point where the scammer will request for more money or cease further communication.

What to look out for and how to protect yourself:

·         Be cautious of all approaches you did not initiate, especially if you are asked to send money online.

·         If you don’t send money straight away, their messages and callsMessages requesting money may become more desperate, persistent, or direct. If you do send money, they continue to ask you to send more.

·         Do not respond to the contact if you’re notunless you are 100% sure if they are genuine.

·            Confirm the identity of the contact by calling the supposed family member directly from via a reliable or previously known contact you have for themnumber.

·         Call someone else in your family or friend circle who may live or has recently been in physical contact with the person that the contact is claiming to be. Try and verify if the request for money appears genuine and arrange for the genuine party to call you directly back to verify if this is a scam.

·         Do not conduct any payments or transfers instructed by the third party until you have verbal confirmation over the phone from the person they are claiming to beintended recipient/family member.

·         Do not provide your banking details, Visa debit Card details or your personal information to anyone over messages, especially on a message that you did not initiate.

If you have any concerns about the legitimacy of correspondence, contact us directly (either via financialcrimes@boq.com.au or using the details on our Contact Us page).

If you think you have paid money to a scammer, contact your bank immediately.

Helpful Links and resources:

https://www.scamwatch.gov.au/

https://au.news.yahoo.com/whatsapp-mum-and-dad-scam-explained-police-issue-warning-140347728.html

https://inews.co.uk/inews-lifestyle/money/bills/whatsapp-scams-soar-uk-fraudster-swindle-money-authorised-push-payment-1441542

https://consumer.ftc.gov/articles/scammers-use-fake-emergencies-steal-your-money

https://inews.co.uk/news/technology/whatsapp-scam-friend-in-need-fraud-message-warning-explained-1295601

 

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May 2022 - BOQ Phishing Text Message 

BOQ has been alerted to a phishing text message that notifies you that your BOQ e-banking has been restricted. The text message contains a hyperlink that takes you to a fake BOQ Internet Banking log-in page.

The phishing website asks for your Customer Access Number (CAN) and password. 

Just because the SMS has “BOQ” in the sender name doesn’t mean it’s real.

Provided the SMS service a scammer is using has the option for a send name, they can send it out using a familiar name. In fact, if you have already received messages from that name, your phone will combine them all, helping the ruse.

But there is one thing you need to pay attention to in order to prove the message is a scam: the URL or domain.

How the URL proves a scam message is a scam

You can’t fake a URL in an SMS or a web browser, and it’s something where if you pay attention to what you’re seeing, you can help ensure you don’t get scammed.

On an SMS, the URL should be what you’re going to. Do not click any links and do not provide your CAN or password that have the below in the URL:

au.cbspid

au.vbspid

au.auth-required

BOQ will never provide you with a link to log into your Internet Banking. Only access Internet Banking by typing www.boq.com.au into your internet browser. 

Numbers the text messages are coming from include (but not limited to): 

+61 497 823 077

If in doubt, contact BOQ via email at Financialcrimes@boq.com.au, by contacting your local branch, or on 1300 55 72 72 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week).

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March 2022 – Scams Targeting Flood-Impacted Communities

Unfortunately, there are a number of scams to be aware of during the period after a Natural Disaster.

Scammers may pretend to be government agencies providing information on flood/disaster relief through text messages and emails ‘phishing’ for your information. These contain malicious links and attachments designed to steal your personal and financial information.

Scammers are also pretending to be Government agencies and other entities offering to help you with applications for financial assistance or payments for disaster relief.

Fundraising appeals often occur in the aftermath of a disaster. Unfortunately, some of these are scams.

What to look out for and how to protect yourself:

  •  Be cautious of all approaches you did not initiate, especially if you are asked to send money online.
  • Confirm the identity of the contact by calling the organisation directly. Do not respond to the contact if you’re not 100% sure.
  • Do not disclose personal information in a phone call, such as sharing your bank account screen, reading out passwords, or providing personal information or login details to MyGov.
  • Trusted organisations will not ask for an upfront payment to process recovery payments. Requests from Services Australia and government departments can be verified with a call to special hotlines made available on their websites.
  • If you donate to an established charity or not-for-profit organisation, make sure it is registered. You can do this by searching through the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Charity Register - https://www.acnc.gov.au/charity/programs/map

If you have concerns about the legitimacy of correspondence, contact us directly via email at Financialcrimes@boq.com.au or using the details on our Contact Us page. 

If you think you have paid money to a scammer, contact your bank immediately.

Helpful Links and resources:

https://recovery.gov.au/recovery-support/fraud-and-scams

https://www.scamwatch.gov.au/types-of-scams/attempts-to-gain-your-personal-information/phishing

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February 2022 - BOQ Phishing Text Message 

BOQ has been alerted to a phishing text message that notifies you that your BOQ e-banking has been restricted. The text message contains a hyperlink that takes you to a fake BOQ Internet Banking log-in page. The phishing website asks for your Customer Access Number (CAN) and password. 

If you receive such a text message, do not click any links and do not provide your CAN or password. BOQ will never provide you with a link to log into your Internet Banking. Only access Internet Banking by typing www.boq.com.au into your internet browser. 

Numbers the text messages are coming from include (but not limited to): 

0448406751, 0488066702, 0448667492, 0448579987, 0401612002, 0467361937

0467686381, 0448347159, 0487110981, 0475843120, 0438404505, 0499616961

0448220275, 0488342114, 0448639221 

If in doubt, contact BOQ via email at Financialcrimes@boq.com.au, by contacting your local branch, or on 1300 55 72 72 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week).

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November 2021 – BOQ Branded Capital Protected Fixed Income Government Funds Scam

BOQ are continuing to report the prevalence of BOQ branded imposter investment scams, similar to what ASIC reported in January. Scammers are attempting to adopt the identities of legitimate BOQ employees and claiming to be selling BOQ Treasury Bonds or Capital Protected Fixed Income Government Funds.

Investors may be targeted from completing enquiry forms, via some third-party or comparison sites, or expressing an interest in investing online.

The imposter reportedly initiates and maintains contact with interested parties, sometimes over an extended period of time.  During this time they may provide application instructions, maturity dates, investment thresholds, and other specific details surrounding possible investment options.

What to look out for

·         Unrealistically high returns or bonds which seem ‘too good to be true’.

·         Consistent pressure to invest due to the ‘risk of missing out’.

·         Professional looking forms or prospectuses with either:

o    ‘lookalike’ email addresses (e.g. info@boqau.com, david.freeman@boq-investments.com, )

o    non-genuine phone numbers (e.g. 07 3999 7455, 02 9136 2538)

·         Unusual requests for personal information.

·         Being asked to pay funds directly into a bank account.

If you have any concerns about the legitimacy of correspondence, please seek independent financial advice or contact us directly (either via financialcrimes@boq.com.au or using the details on our Contact Us page). 

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October 2021 – BOQ Phishing Email

BOQ has been alerted to a phishing email that advises you have a new message in your online banking account. The email contains a hyperlink that takes you to a fake BOQ Internet Banking log-in page. The phishing website asks for your Customer Access Number (CAN) and password. 

If you receive such an email, do not click any links and do not provide your CAN or password. BOQ will never provide you with a link to log into your Internet Banking. Only access Internet Banking by typing www.boq.com.au into your internet browser. 

If in doubt, contact BOQ on 1300 55 72 72 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week) or email Financialcrimes@boq.com.au 

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October 2021 – BOQ Branded Imposter Bond Scam

We have been made aware of a BOQ branded imposter bond scam, similar to what ASIC reported in January. Scammers are attempting to adopt the identities of legitimate BOQ employees and claiming, “to be selling treasury bonds at 5.75%”.

Investors may be targeted from completing enquiry forms, via some third-party or comparison sites, or expressing an interest in investing online.

The imposter reportedly initiates and maintains contact with interested parties, sometimes over an extended period of time.  During this time they may provide application instructions, maturity dates, investment thresholds, and other specific details surrounding possible investment options.

What to look out for

  • Unrealistically high returns or bonds which seem ‘too good to be true’.
  • Consistent pressure to invest due to the ‘risk of missing out’.
  • Professional looking forms or prospectuses with either:
    • ‘lookalike’ email addresses (e.g. info@boqau.com)
    • non-genuine phone numbers (e.g. 07 3999 7455)
  • Unusual requests for personal information.
  • Being asked to pay funds directly into a bank account.

If you have any concerns about the legitimacy of correspondence, please seek independent financial advice or contact us directly (either via financialcrimes@boq.com.au or using the details on our Contact Us page). 

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September 2021 – Apple iOS, macOS and Safari vulnerabilities

Apple have identified two vulnerabilities in the operating systems of multiple devices (e.g. iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, MacBook).  This Australian Cyber Security Centre (ACSC) alert lists the operating systems affected.

Some vulnerable devices may be exposed to being infiltrated by hackers who can execute code to install malware or take other actions.  All without the user clicking any links.  This may enable criminals to steal personal data or interfere with, or compromise, banking services.

How to protect yourself

  • Update your Apple mobile and laptop/personal computer devices immediately.
  • Setup automatic software updates on your mobile devices and laptops/personal computers.
  • Install reputable antivirus and anti-theft/loss protection software, only from official sources (e.g. App Store or Google Play Store for mobile devices).
  • On mobile devices, adjust settings to require a password before installing new applications.
  • Avoid letting your device automatically connect to new WiFi networks without confirmation.
  • Consider registering to the ACSC Alert Service.

If you have any concerns of your banking services having been compromised, contact BOQ urgently on 1300 55 72 72 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week) or email financialcrimes@boq.com.au

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June 2021 – Ponzi/Pyramid Scheme Apps

BOQ customers have recently been falling victim to Ponzi/pyramid scheme apps, such as the ‘Hope Business App’.

A Ponzi scheme is an investment scam, where participants are paid profits from the funds collected from new participants. Often, participants must pay an up-front fee, around $200-$500, before they can start earning. The schemes then use this joining fee to pay the ‘commission’ or ‘service rewards’ of earlier participants.

Early participants may see some return of funds and thus believe the scheme to be legitimate. However, some BOQ customers have reported being unsuccessful in cashing out any funds from these apps.

You can read more about this from a recent Queensland Police post.

What to look out for

  • Substantial up-front or ‘joining’ fees.
  • Promises of high returns with little or no risk.
  • Pressure to invest further funds.
  • Apps removed from Apple’s App Store or Google’s Play Store.
  • Unregistered company who ‘promotes’ the app or scheme.

Remember, if it’s too good to be true, it probably is. If in doubt, contact BOQ urgently on 1300 55 72 72 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week).

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May 2021 - Threat and Penalty Scams 

We have seen a rise in Threat and Penalty Scams made against our customers.

Scammers have been calling BOQ customers and impersonating legitimate government or law enforcement agencies. The scammers make threats of arrest, legal action or compromised account activity. Scammers then ask customers to make a payment to them or to a 'secure account'.

To appear legitimate, some scammers may ask for the customer’s local police station and claim they will receive a phone call.  These scammers then spoof (imitate) the police station’s phone number in order to convince the customer of the legitimacy of the call. Unfortunately, this has resulted in some BOQ customers falling victim and making a payment to the scammers.

If you receive any calls claiming to be from a government department or law enforcement agencies making similar threats, hang up the phone immediately. Call the government department or law enforcement agency back on a trusted number e.g. from their website.

If in doubt, contact BOQ urgently on 1300 55 72 72 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week). 

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December 2020 - Phishing

BOQ has been alerted to a phishing email that advises you have a new message in your online banking account. The email contains a hyperlink that takes you to a fake BOQ Internet Banking log-in page. The phishing website asks for your Customer Access Number (CAN) and password.

If you receive such an email, do not click any links and do not provide your CAN or password. BOQ will never provide you with a link to log into your Internet Banking. Only access Internet Banking by typing www.boq.com.au into your internet browser. 

If in doubt, contact BOQ urgently on 1300 55 72 72 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week).